Looking People In the Eye

Looking People In the Eye

On a recent Saturday afternoon I was on Facebook and poking around in an Asperger’s group I’m in when the topic turned once again to lack of eye contact and the social repercussions from this egregious sin against humanity.

This one particular person ended up being arrested after a traffic stop because he wouldn’t look the officer in the eye and even after identifying that looking people in the eye made him extremely uncomfortable, this person was arrested and told he must have a reason to be nervous if he wouldn’t look the officer in the eye.

This person was cuffed, booked and immediately released.

This is just one story of a person on the spectrum who has trouble making eye contact. Luckily it’s not as big a deal for me as it is for others, but I’ve known people who are so terrified to make eye contact with someone that it makes them physically shake.

The biggest hurdle we face with this situation is the reaction we get from the neurotypicals (those without autism) that we’re dealing with.

We get anything from people rolling their eyes at us to them making disparaging comments about our character, our upbringing, our guilty feelings and so much more.

FYI, we don’t see the eye-rolling happening since we’re not looking them in the eye. People tell us.

Why do people have to deal with this disrespect because of something in many cases that they physically can’t control? Why are others so judgmental when someone is paying attention to the conversation, participating, coherently in the conversation but just not looking the other person in the eye?

Some people call them traits, and I sometimes do as well from time to time, but I prefer to think of myself as quirky and not weird, so the way I look at it, not looking people in the eye is a natural quirk that some of us have and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that.

With all that being said, should those of us who have the eye contact problem work to overcome it? Absolutely.

Just as we want the neurotypicals to accept us for who we are and to learn about our ways, and us we need to do the same. It’s a give and take. We learn about you and you learn about us.

I know there are some that have strong opinions regarding this, so I want to hear from you. Positive or negative, let’s hear your opinion on the subject.

A version of this post appeared on Good Men Project under the Not Weird Just Autistic Column on October 28, 2018.

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The Autistic Week That Was

The Autistic Week That Was

How can we get through life when there’s little understanding?

First things first. I can see how many of you off the spectrum, those referred to as neurotypicals, could read the headline as saying that people off the spectrum don’t understand people on the spectrum.


That’s NOT what I’m saying at all. I’m saying it’s true that many on the spectrum aren’t understood by those off, there are also moments that we don’t understand what we’re going through at a particular moment.

This week I had a couple of those moments. Moments where a friend saw one thing and I saw another. I hate when that happens because I ‘m not stupid. I know that depression and anxiety are constant companions of mine as they are for many on the spectrum.


I try to do a good job of assessing a situation and how I will react or am going to react to it, but I don’t have a crystal ball and don’t always see everything in the correct light when it comes to me. I think, “I played ice hockey for years. I’m tough. I can get through this.”

But I can’t and know I can’t

As someone with Asperger’s Syndrome, I tend to shy away from social situations, so my circle of friends is very small and tends to be mostly colleagues. I’m telling this so you understand I don’t have a clan or posse to go and hang out with to talk things over. I internalize, try to deal with things myself and then a bad situation just gets worse.

When I get frustrated, as happened several times this week, I get down on myself in a big way. You see, with my Asperger’s comes a high IQ, that makes me feel like I should be able to figure out whatever the problem is. It also comes with not being able to figure out why i can’t “get” whatever it is that I’m supposed to be getting. If you think that feeling is amazing, you would be wrong.

There’s a song by 90’s alternative one-hit wonder Lit that should be my ring tone. One line from the song in particular defines my life, though I wish it wouldn’t.

It’s no surprise to me I am my own worst enemy
Cuz’ every now and then I kick the living s*** out of me

I don’t beat myself up physically but I will take on pretty much anyone that wants to get into a battle of beating themselves up mentally. I’m not proud if it, but over my many years of life, I’ve learned how to do it.

But now I need to learn something else. How to stop it.

You see, the week that was, was a week from hell. It was a week that left me sitting in a dark room for several hours on my birthday because I really had nothing better to do and because I was reflecting back on my life and seeing all the things I haven’t accomplished in my life.

I also tried to figure out how to make my life better, but I wasn’t getting clear answers. I never seem to get clear answers to those questions and when I do, the answers fill me with fear and I don’t want to pursue the thing that I know in my heart is the best thing for me. Stupid, huh?

So how do we get through life when we have little understanding from our support circle, if we have one, or from ourselves? The answer is one step at a time. We need to take things slowly and take in all the information that we can about the situation so we can understand it.

We also need to remember that even though we feel like we can figure things out and that we can get through certain situations, we don’t always have that luxury and that’s ok. It’s called being human. I forget that on a regular basis because I KNOW that I should be able to figure things out, but the reality is that I should know I can’t.

Helping others on the spectrum means that I have to get myself tuned up from time to time and I do work on that on a regular basis. I’ve found someone who understands disabilities, setbacks and frustration. It’s a slow process, but I’m grateful for my friend and colleague Brian King who helps me to be the best me that I can be.

Does he get in my face? Yeah, when I need it? Does he hold back any punches or withhold any BS? Absolutely not.

So, to sum it up, the key to getting through our weeks, both the rough ones and the easy ones, is to work with our families and inner circle of friends but also to take an introspective look at ourselves. Do what we do best and put those brains to work!

Break down the situation and go through it step by step so that you can figure out what went right and what needs to be worked on.

Being on the spectrum is nothing to be ashamed of and there’s no reason to look down on ourselves for who we are. The sooner we realize this, the sooner our problems will lessen and our life will seem easier.

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Enjoy the video that the above lyrics came from.  My Own Worst Enemy by Lit.

How Sully the Service Dog Made Me Cry

How Sully the Service Dog Made Me Cry

Last Tuesday I watched a video of Sully, former President George H.W. Bush’s service dog, pay his last respects at the Capitol building and I wasn’t prepared for the reaction I would have.

I watched as Sully was led in and as he properly sat in front of his former master’s casket. I noted the looks on the faces of those sitting and standing in the Capitol Rotunda as this was taking place and the tears started to well up.

There seemed to be a sadness in Sully’s eyes as he sat down again after his handler took him to the other side of the casket. That’s the moment I had to pause the video and cry.

I’m not a war hero, a former president, a successful businessman, or in the grand scheme of life, anyone of any importance, but I have an autism service dog, Tye, and in that moment I wondered what Tye would do if something were to happen to me.

Then I wondered what I would do if something were to happen to Tye before me, which is most likely.

The tears were once again flowing at that thought and I went to my bedroom (a benefit of working from home), crawled into bed and waited the ten seconds for Tye to come leaping onto my bed.

For the next half hour, maybe longer, I lay on my bed holding onto Tye and feeling blessed to have him in my life. When I started crying again, he put his paw on my face, as if to wipe away the tears. Good thing he didn’t know they were for him.

Tye can sense my mood, tell a difference in my heart rate and blood pressure from across the house and knows when things are going well and when they’re not. Tuesday was definitely one of the “not” days.

Just under two minutes into the 2:36 video, Sully laid on the ground just a few feet from the former President, as I would guess he did many times in the few months Bush 41 had Sully.

As he lays there, eyes on the casket, you’ll notice one other thing that he does. Every few moments he looks around and scans the crowd. You see, George Herbert Walker Bush is no longer with us, but Sully is still watching over his master and protecting him, constantly scanning for any danger to his master.

According to Shawn Abell of Dogs Nation, where Tye was trained, Sully can smell the former President, even in his casket, and that is why he is still watching over his owner.

As I sit at my desk typing away I hear a familiar snore from about ten feet away and I know Tye is where he usually spends his day, laying on a blanket where he can be near me, yet still see both the front and back door. He’s watching over me, just like a good service dog should.

As soon as I stop typing and start sobbing, he immediately gets up and comes to sit by my side with his head on my leg, showing me that he’s here for me to comfort me and help me through my day.

No matter where you stand in the realm of politics, it’s great to see that the White House, who is responsible for handling presidential viewings and funerals, made sure that Sully was a special part of the celebration.

Though our forty-first president only had Sully a short time, he had become a special member of the Bush family and he deserved to have his final moments with his former master.

Thanks to Dogs Nation and other groups that train service dogs for military veterans. You do our country a great service and for that, we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

Sully is headed back to Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington D.C. where he will soon help other veterans in need, just as he did for 41.

A version of this post appeared on Good Men Project under the Not Weird Just Autistic column on December 5, 2018.

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Beware the Trap of Being On the Spectrum and Turning 18 Can you avoid being one of the forgotten ones in this weird, lonely world or will you seize the day?

Beware the Trap of Being On the Spectrum and Turning 18 Can you avoid being one of the forgotten ones in this weird, lonely world or will you seize the day?

I’ve got some news for you and you’re probably not going to like it.  If you thought it was tough to be autistic and in school or if it was tough being the parent of a school-age child on the spectrum, the party is just beginning.

Forget about IEPs or whatever your school district calls their plans for your autistic child.  As most of us know, these pieces of paper are worthless.  I say most of us because there are some school districts that truly care and go out of their way to help our kids and who want to help shape them into productive adults.  

Those districts are few and far between.


You may be asking yourself, J.R., what the heck do you know about any of this since you were diagnosed as an adult and since there was no autism when you were in school?  That’s a great question and I’m glad you asked that.

I coached ice hockey for too many years to count and worked with kids in clinics from age four-adult and coached teams from age nine-high school varsity.  Besides teaching them hockey I also strove to teach them life lessons. My point is that for years I’ve been helping kids be the very best they can be.

After my diagnosis with Asperger’s at age forty-six, I hid away for two years telling a small handful of people about my diagnosis.  After “coming out” a couple years later I began finding out that if you were a child on the spectrum, the government, charities and other fundraising groups were all too happy to throw their money at charities catering to you.,

Trying to find any funding, programs or help for those around the age of sixteen and up was like trying to find Bigfoot.  You heard stories that in other places people had seen such a thing for adults, but no one could actually confirm it.


Earlier in the year when the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) had the number of people on the spectrum as 1-68, there were 50,000 autistics turning eighteen every year.  Yes, you read that correctly.  50,000.  Since then the CDC has lowered the number to 1-59.  I’m not a math genius, but for argument’s sake let’s just say that the 50,000 has now grown to closer to 60,000.  Can we all agree on that?

How is the future of America being prepared for life after high school?  How are they being prepared for the opportunities to not only contribute to society but to be leaders in their chosen field or in the community?  The answer will shock you.

As hard as we try, sometimes we don’t understand the way things are being taught

Let’s take a quick look at what middle and high school is like for someone on the spectrum.  Since our brains are wired differently, we don’t always speak the same language as the teachers.  That’s to say that we don’t always follow what they’re saying and need it explained in a different way.

Many of these kids have IQs that are either average slightly above average or flat out off the charts and the teachers, frustrated with the number of questions and not enjoying he disruptions are sending these perfectly abled autistic kids into special ed. 

That’s not a typo. They go to special ed where their peers label them as Sped Kids (Sped for special ed).


A lot of kids on the spectrum have trouble in maybe one or two subjects but either hold their own or excel at the rest.  Why should they be lumped in with students who are behind them academically just because some teachers don’t want to deal with the questions?

To answer the question above, schools (in general) are preparing our kids for life after high school by sending them the message that they are less than the “regular” students in the school and that they probably won’t have much of a chance to succeed since they only had a remedial education.  I know if I was the parent of a child in this situation I would be frustrated, angry and fight for the rights of my child.

As your child prepares to turn 18 what are you going to do about it?


Will you simply decide that college isn’t in the cards and have your student find a job of some kind or have you decided that they’re going to college?  There are more opportunities out there and I’m here to help. Finding the best fit for your particular child is of utmost importance.  They’re unique individuals with special skill sets, likes and dislikes, so why not find something for them that’s right in their wheelhouse?

In the coming days there will be more information on this, so keep checking back and sign up to get new posts by email in your inbox!

Photo courtesy Unsplash

On the Spectrum and Completely Depressed Is there a way to get this monkey off your back once and for all?

On the Spectrum and Completely Depressed Is there a way to get this monkey off your back once and for all?

The last two weeks have been less than stellar. And by “less than stellar,” I mean they sucked. Whatever I worked on seemed to be wrong, my self-esteem was in the toilet and life, in general, wasn’t a whole lot of fun.

But on the bright side, I didn’t have any suspicious packages mailed to me this week. Of course, there were also no regular looking packages either. Not getting packages is the upside to not being famous.

My point with the whole suspicious package thing is even though I know there’s a brighter side out there, sometimes I just can’t see it, or sense it in any way. I know it’s there, but there are times it simply takes a while to find the brighter side.

But we can and will eventually find the brighter side!

To answer the question at the top of the page, is there a way to get this monkey off our back once and for all? Sadly no. Depression and anxiety are things that we will always have to live with to some degree, but we can find ways to make it easier. We can come up with ways to get the depression gone in a few days rather than a few weeks or months.

“J.R.,” you say. “It sounds like you’re going from the bright side to sating anxiety and depression are always nearby.”

Yes, I did say that, but what I hadn’t yet gotten to, is the fact that we can learn to control the depression and anxiety with some coping mechanisms.

Just as each person on the spectrum is unique, each of us has our unique ways of settling down and letting go. What follows are several ideas for getting rid of stress, depression and anxiety quickly, before you fall down the proverbial rabbit hole.

Go outside and do something. This is one I struggle with in a big way. I tend to plant myself at my desk day after day. Then depression sets in and I say I’m going to leave the house, but I don’t.

When I do make myself get outside to either walk, sit out on the patio and read or just relax, I feel better. If I know I feel better when I go do things, why do I sit at my desk, hyperfocusing and not going outside?

FYI, going out to the front yard in pajama pants isn’t going outside.

 

Find your thing that clears (or helps clear) your mind. For some it’s meditation, others yoga or exercise. Whatever it is for you, start doing it or if you are doing it, do it more!

I try to meditate, but its still a work in progress. One thing I like to do is sit in my beach themed reading area in my office, light a couple sticks of incense and either sit with my eyes closed and just relax or I nerd out and read comic books. Looking over, I see I have a decent sized reading stack piling up.

The idea is to get your mind off the depression or the anxiety that’s weighing on you and get it onto something fun or onto nothing at all. If you’re not thinking/obsessing over it, it can’t bother you too bad.

 

Believe in yourself. This is the absolute hardest one for me. My self-esteem is naturally down. It has been my whole life and though I hate it, I deal with it. I’ve actually gone as far as working with a man who has overcome way more than I ever had to and has soared.

If this is something you struggle with, follow the link to check out more on Brian.

 

The final tip I have is simple. Find a person or two that you completely trust and let them know what they need to look out for. You may think that you’re baring all your weaknesses, but if this person has your best interest in mind, they’ll see it as strength and not weakness.

How do you deal with depression, anxiety or any of your other traits? What’s worked and what hasn’t? Let us know.

***

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An Asperger’s Guide To Dating Neurotypicals is out and hit #23 on the Amazon Hot New Dating Releases Chart. You can find it on Amazon and Kindle or get an autographed copy for the same price at the J.R. Reed Author website.

Before I go, I belong to a closed Facebook group, Aspergers Life Support, run by some terrific people. There’s a link on the right or you can click on the words in purple. If you have Aspergers or are a loving NT of an Aspie, I definitely suggest asking to join the group. They’re great people and have helped me on many occasions.

 

Photos courtesy Unsplash

All About Finding Courage and Leaving Your Comfort Zone What do you expect will happen when you finally destroy the walls of fear once and for all?

All About Finding Courage and Leaving Your Comfort Zone What do you expect will happen when you finally destroy the walls of fear once and for all?

Ah, the comfort zone.  It’s where we like to be, but there are times when it’s not where we should be.  In order to grow as individuals, we have to push ourselves beyond our comfort zone and get out there and be afraid sometimes.

While fear is technically a four letter word, it’s not a four letter word in the sense that other words that begin with the letter F are defined as four letter words.  Do you see the point I’m trying to make?  If not, what I’m saying that fear isn’t necessarily a bad thing when it comes to doing things we want to do that will help us grow as people and don’t hold the possibility of death, such as skydiving.  Skydiving is definitely out of my comfort zone.

For those of us on the spectrum, being in a crowd gives us the heebie-jeebies and scares us to the point of a panic attack or even a meltdown, but it doesn’t have to.  Last night I had one such experience and since I’m here to write this post, I can say with 100% certainty that I survived the experience and stayed in my comfort zone.

I’ve mentioned quite a few times on the blog that I moved from the hustle and bustle of Southern California to the Ozarks in August of 2017, in large part to cut down on the sensory overload I was experiencing with my Asperger’s.  Now instead of bright lights, people moving everywhere, traffic and my senses being bombarded from all sides 24/7, I live between two lakes, amongst trees in a log cabin near Branson, MO.

For those who don’t know what Branson is all about, think of a mostly country and western version of Broadway with some other types of shows thrown in for good measure.  At last count, including touring acts that will stop by for just one or two nights, there are approximately 150-165 shows in Branson this year, with the majority of them running March-October.

Then in November these same shows change it up and run Christmas shows through the end of the year before taking a couple months out of the spotlight as they prepare to do it all over again.
 

Last night I was invited to the Terry Awards, Branson’s version of the Tony Awards. 

 
It sounded like a lot of fun and something I was looking forward to, then I got the real info.  The theatre seated 750 people and was expected to be full.  Since I was going as a member of the media, taking my autism service dog, Tye, with me wasn’t really an option, so I was on my own and knew I would be way out of my comfort zone,

I’ve had situations like these come up in the past and the first few didn’t go well.  As time went on, however, I learned to (kind of) overcome my fear and learn how to best handle this type of situation.  While events like last night are still uncomfortable for me and often make me want to run, I’ve found a few things that help me get through them and stay (mostly) in my comfort zone.
 

The first is to remember that as bad as you may think it’s going to be, the world will NOT stop spinning and you will not die from your fear.  This one is hard to believe at first, but trust me, you will survive and remain intact.

 
Find out as much as you can about the event or place you’re going so you know what to expect.  In the case of last night, it was a pre-party at a Mexican restaurant and then the awards show.  I knew that if the restaurant got too crowded, I could always step outside to catch my breath and remove myself from the crowd until I felt like I could go back in and be back in my comfort zone.

We were lucky enough to have tickets near the back of the theatre on the aisle so I could step out into the lobby or again outside if I felt a panic attack coming on.  When I’m able to pick my seats for events, I do like to sit near the back and on the aisle.  This is partially because I generally have Tye with me, but also because I can slip out mostly undetected if the need arises.

It’s OK to hang off to the side and not mingle and schmooze.  Just because you’re somewhere you don’t feel comfortable doesn’t mean you have to jump into the middle of things.  Staying off to the side is OK.  Hiding in the corner and looking like a creeper, not so much.  But finding a spot where you feel comfortable and where you think you can be without a lot of people coming up to you is the ideal location and a terrific place for your comfort zone to be.

Build appropriate downtime into your schedule both before and after the event that will pull you out of your comfort zone.  Doing so will give your body and your mind what it needs to both prepare and to decompress and process the stressful event.  For example, I made sure that I had nothing planned for the two hours before the event yesterday so that I could relax.  I spent a half hour laying down, knowing I wouldn’t actually sleep, but just resting.

This morning I let myself sleep another ninety minutes later than I normally would have so that I would be well rested and ready to face the day.  So far it’s worked.  I’ve been productive, gotten most of my work finished and had a great time last night.  I even got to meet someone I never thought I would meet.

J.R. Reed www,notweirdjustautistic.com comfort zone

Hanging with Miss Lulu of the TV show Hee Haw

Growing up, my family used to gather around the TV and watch Hee Haw.  Who should I run into last night at the awards?  It was Miss Lulu from the show and one who performed in Branson for many years,  She even got up on stage to sing during the show, which was very cool.
 
Now I want to hear from you.
 
Do you have trouble getting out of your comfort zone?  If so, what have you tried that hasn’t worked and if you have been successful, what have you done to successfully stay comfortable in what normally wouldn’t be your comfort zone?  We want to know!

Photo Courtesy Pixabay

Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired? Have the Courage to Conquer Fear and Fake It 'til You Make It

Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired? Have the Courage to Conquer Fear and Fake It 'til You Make It

Believe it or not, I’m not as comfortable with myself as most people think I am. Even with the purple goatee, a large, colorful collection of Converse and an array of cardigans and vests that I love to wear. The truth is, that most days I don’t feel good about myself and frankly, I’m sick and tired of feeling that way.

I’ve heard all the, “Fake it ’til you make it” speeches and I know people are right when they tell me that. I do try to fake it, knowing that one day I too will finally believe it long term, but for now, my belief comes in short bursts.
I’m sitting at my desk on Sunday morning drinking coffee and listening to music through my headphones as I piece together what I’m going to write when Falling For the First Time by Barenaked Ladies (one of Canada’s better exports) came on.

It’s a song I love and have heard probably a thousand times before, but as I listened to the lyrics (which will be in blue and a larger font) it hit me that these lyrics tie in with what I’m writing about. So, grab your beverage of choice, sit back and read this because I’m only going to write this

One Time

 

J.R. Reed www.notweirdjustautistic.com sick and tired

Sometimes we fake cool even though we don’t feel cool.

I’m so cool, too bad I’m a loser

I’m not really cool, at least not in my mind and I don’t pretend to be cool. However, I’ve been told that with the bright colors and black porkpie hat I’m generally wearing, that I come off as someone who has a lot of self-esteem and is very comfortable with themselves. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Yes, I enjoy being me and I won’t deny that to anyone, but more often than not I feel like I’m a loser rather than a winner. That’s a stupid thought because I’ve accomplished a lot in my life, but the last ten years or so have been, to coin a hockey coaching phrase, a gong show. In other words, pretty bad.

Every day the self-esteem is getting better thanks to a couple trusted friends and colleagues, but I’d really like to find some kind of Disney Fast Pass so I can make it to the front of the line faster and put all the negativity behind me for good. Why? Because I’m sick and tired of feeling that way. But for now, I do my best to put on a happy face and fake it, knowing/hoping one day I won’t have to put the happy face on because it will already be there.

I’m so smart, too bad I can’t get anything figured out

With my Asperger’s comes a very high IQ, but to be honest, that doesn’t mean anything to me. I don’t have a college degree and I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve looked at a set of directions or instructions on how to do something and had a big question mark above my head. What good is a high IQ if you don’t do anything with it?

I’m not saying there’s nothing I can’t figure out, but it does frustrate me that I was born before the word autism was used in schools and that trying to go to college was a joke for me. I tried to learn, but couldn’t figure things out the way the teacher was teaching it, so I would leave class confused because the teacher didn’t have time and would generally tell me that if I was paying attention I would understand.

Comments like that erode your self-esteem as did the teachers in fifth-ninth grades who called me weird stupid and lazy. I was sick and tired of hearing the comments from them and hoped high school would be better. Nope.
The high school journalism teacher told me to take another class because I didn’t know how to write and never would. I think I’ll dedicate my next book to her.

I’m so fly, that’s probably why it feels like I’m falling for the first time

Yeah. I’m not fly. I’m probably the anti-fly. Although I do love the Offspring song, Pretty Fly For a White Guy. I do have my moments of fly-ness, though they’re few and far between. Truth be told, I’d rather they be many and constant. I guess I’ll just have to fake being fly for a while–whatever that really means.

There are times that the self-esteem gets so bad that it feels like I’m falling into that pit of despair for the first time and I can’t even begin to tell you how bad that feels. It’s like a narrow well with nothing to grab onto to pull yourself out. That’s why we need a support system to help us out when we fall into that pit of despair.
As much as we want to hold things in and, well, be a man, it’s not logical to do so. If that’s how we’re going to live our lives then we’ll be in that well for a long time. Personally, I’m sick and tired of falling into that well.

I’m so sane, it’s driving me crazy

I’m high-functioning autistic, have had a stroke and am ADD. As my psychologist likes to joke, I’m a certain kind of special. When I think of these lyrics it reminds me that there are times when we as people with mental health issues find that we’re doing good and think we don’t need our medication anymore, but that is one of the biggest lies we tell ourselves.

If we stop taking the medicines that help stabilize us and keep us functioning at a normal level, it will absolutely make us crazy. Trust me. I know about this one from first-hand experience. Actually, a couple of first-hand experiences. If you’re not comfortable on your medication and want to try something more homeopathic, talk to your doctor first. Don’t play Russian roulette with your mental health.

J.R. Reed www/notweirdjustautistic.com sick and tired

When we lose our direction in life, it’s not a map that we need.

What if I lost my direction? What if I lost my sense of time?

Get back with that friend or network of loved ones mentioned earlier, you know, the ones who can pull you out of the well. Let them help you get back on the right path because as much as you want to convince yourself you can do it alone, you cant.

Recently I started taking my own advice and started texting a friend every day who needs a support system as well. It works out great for both of us as we can check in with someone who has an understanding of what the other is going through.

I’m so done, turn me over

That’s it. We’re done. The bottom line is this. You need a support system, even if that system is only one person and you have to do your best to fake it ’til you make it. I personally find that difficult, but I try to do it almost every day. Eventually, it will stick and life will be like walking on sunshine!

Want to keep up with what’s going on at Not Weird Just Autistic?

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An Asperger’s Guide To Dating Neurotypicals is out and hit #23 on the Amazon Hot New Dating Releases Chart. You can find it on Amazon and Kindle or get an autographed copy for the same price at the J.R. Reed Author website.

Before I go, I belong to a closed Facebook group, Aspergers Life Support, run by some terrific people. There’s a link on the right or you can click on the words in purple. If you have Aspergers or are a loving NT of an Aspie, I definitely suggest asking to join the group. They’re great people and have helped me on many occasions.

Lyrics by Ed Robertson & Steven Page
Photos by Pixabay

Depression Is Deadly.  This 1 Tip Will Blow Your Mind You can't win the fight alone. You need help from a friend

Depression Is Deadly. This 1 Tip Will Blow Your Mind You can't win the fight alone. You need help from a friend

Depression is no joke.  It affects everyone differently and for me, depression completely takes me off my game.  I know I can’t focus to write or do any other work, so I sit around and stress out.  That does no one any good, least of all me. Because of this my health suffers, both mentally and physically.

As much as I want to curl up and go back to bed, hoping I wake up and the depression is gone, it doesn’t work that way.  Depression is an ugly monster that follows you around and torments you whether you’re working, sleeping or just sitting around because you don’t feel like having fun.  If you try to sleep, it just sits on the end of your bed d is right there when you wake up

There are blog posts, magazine articles and books all dedicated to overcoming depression, but there’s one simple trick that I was reminded of last night by my friend Jason Cotton on the weekly Mental Health call I host for Good Men Project.  I tried his idea this morning and I don’t know that it helped, but I know it didn’t hurt.

The idea is this.

 

J.R. Reed www.notweirdjustautistic.com depression

Texting a friend to check in and let them know your mental status is important

Find a friend, family member or loved one (maybe even two) that you trust and check in with them on a daily basis to let them know how you’re doing. It can be face-to-face via phone or text or even an email.

In the case of Jason, it works out great as he’s bi-polar and also needs someone to check in with.  I sent him a quick text this morning asking how he was doing and letting him know that I was feeling a bit blah, but I knew that I could power through it.

I also told him that I’d see him at our local comic book shop tonight where we generally gather on Friday nights to play nerd games.  I’ve written before about each of us having an inner nerd and that we need to let it come out and my type of nerd is a comic book nerd.

It helps to have friends who understand what you’re going through and although Jason is bi-polar whereas I’m high-functioning autistic, we share a lot of the same overlapping traits such as depression and anxiety.  I get a lot of what he’s going through and he gets a lot of what I’m going through.  It’s good to have friends who understand.

Friends are key

When I think of having friends who understand and have your back, I think of the TV show Friends.  Yeah, referencing that show proves how old I am, but it’s not just the show that I think of, it’s the theme song by the Rembrandts.

So no one told you life was gonna be this way
Your job’s a joke, you’re broke
Your love life’s D.O.A
It’s like you’re always stuck in second gear
When it hasn’t been your day, your week, your month
Or even your year, but
I’ll be there for you
(When the rain starts to pour)
I’ll be there for you
(Like I’ve been there before)
I’ll be there for you
(‘Cause you’re there for me too)
No one could ever know me
No one could ever see me
Seems you’re the only one who knows
What it’s like to be me
Someone to face the day with
Make it through all the rest with
Someone I’ll always laugh with
Even at my worst, I’m best with you, yeah

 

The lyrics hint at a romantic angle to the relationship they’re talking about, but it can just as easily be a friendship like the one I was talking about earlier.  One where you are friends with someone going through similar things as you. Someone you can share your worst with and you know that even if they may not totally get it, they’re still there for you and can identify with your pain.

 

My challenge to you

 

If you’re suffering from any sort of mental illness or other neurological condition, try and find just one friend or loved one who you can check in with and who you can talk to about what you’re going through.  Once you do, you have no clue how much better it will make you feel.

 

Depression is a bully that you can overcome, but only if you want to.

 

Want to keep up with what’s going on at Not Weird Just Autistic? 

Enter your email in the upper right-hand corner where it says, “Get new posts by email” and you’ll be one of the first to get the fresh dirt on all this good stuff.

An Asperger’s Guide To Dating Neurotypicals is out and hit #23 on the Amazon Hot New Dating Releases Chart.  You can find it on Amazon and Kindle or get an autographed copy for the same price at the J.R. Reed Author website.

Before I go, I belong to a closed Facebook group, Aspergers Life Support, run by some terrific people.  There’s a link on the right or you can click on the words in purple.  If you have Aspergers or are a loving NT of an Aspie, I definitely suggest asking to join the group.  They’re great people and have helped me on many occasions.

Songwriters: Michael Jay Skloff / David L Crane / Marta Fran Kauffman / Allee Willis / Philip Ronald Solem / Danny C Wilde

 

Photos courtesy Pixabay

Sick and Tired of Drowning in Depression? Turn the Tables and Be Happy I can't remember the last time I was truly happy

Sick and Tired of Drowning in Depression? Turn the Tables and Be Happy I can't remember the last time I was truly happy

Drowning.  When I think of that word I think of one of the most horrible ways to die.  Flailing around in the water with nothing to hold onto and no one to help you.  You’re on your own in something that seems expansive, yet could be something as small as a bathtub.

Drowning is what it feels like for me on a daily basis as I battle depression and do everything in my power to find the happiness that I know is out there.  It feels like my chances of finding happiness are slim to none, though that’s absolutely not true. 

How do I know this?  I can’t remember the last time I was truly happy and I’ve been searching for years.  The logical side of my autistic brain tells me that if I haven’t found it yet, my chances of ever finding happiness again are getting worse by the day.  The realistic part of my brain tells me that if others are happy, I can be as well.

The optimistic side of me wants to believe that today will be the day I stop drowning in depression and find my happiness, but as always, the day ends with me getting kicked in the junk, finding no happiness and feeling like an idiot for believing it was possible.

Sure, there have been moments where I stop treading water and find something to momentarily hang onto so I can enjoy a few moments of happiness, but it passes.  Once it does, just like Leonardo at the end of  Titanic, I can only hold on for so long and then I start sinking and it’s back to drowning in my depression.

What can we do as high functioning autistics to battle drowning in depression? 

That’s a good question with a not-so-clear answer, considering that although we’re similar in many of our traits, each is unique as autistic individuals.  One way is to get out of the house more and stop shutting ourselves off from the world.  Yes, that’s easier said than done, but we need to make a conscious effort to do it.

J.R. Reed www.notweirdjustautistic.com drowning

Sitting in an empty house drowning in depression is no way to live your life.

I went to the chiropractor and comic book store this morning and as I drove away from the house, I realized I hadn’t left here in five days and that was only to go grocery shopping.  That is NOT what I mean when I say to get out of the house.  The kind of getting out of the house that I’ve been doing will only keep you drowning and that’s not what we want to do.

We want to get out and be around people or be surrounded by nature.  We want to get out where we can interact, think about things and feel good about what we’re doing.  I’ve lived in the Ozarks for a year now and though I have a couple people I consider friends, they’re not people that I’ve socialized with.

That means I either need to get out and find people I can socialize with (a very scary thought for the typical high functioning autistic) or I stay at home drowning.  Drowning, in case it’s not already painfully clear, is the thing we don’t want to do.

Find groups, such as Meetup groups, that fit an interest you have or check with your local community center, ask someone you know or search the Internet.  Talking to a psychologist or therapist may also yield some good ideas on how to stop the drowning and grab onto happiness once and for all.

If your psychiatrist has prescribed medicine, one way to stop drowning in depression is to make sure you take it on a daily basis and as prescribed.

I cannot emphasize this enough.  I’ve looked back over the past few months and have noticed a pattern in my life.  Although I really like my psychiatrist, I could do without his support staff.  He’s at a large group and inevitably, every few months appointments get scheduled that are several days after I’ve run out of most of my medications. 

When I mention that this is going to happen, I’m told that I can either take the appointment or I can not take it and wait longer.  I’ve mentioned this to the doctor, asking if he could write an extra refill on my medications so I can get through to the next appointment, but I’m told he can only write so many refills.  

Of course, I can always be notified of the mythical cancellation. so I can get in sooner.  There has NEVER been a cancellation that I’ve been notified of.

Doing something physical is another opportunity to combat depression.  Whether it’s yoga, walking the dog, hitting the gym, kayaking or whatever your thing is, getting out and getting your heart pumping and your body moving has been shown in study after study to lower depression in people.

Find something you’re interested in and do it with other people.  Let’s face it, we’re all nerds in some wayBy “all,” I mean neurotypicals as well as those of us on the spectrum.  Find what gets your nerd blood pumping and engage in that nerdy activity with others. 

I’ve been a comic book nerd for years.

J.R. Reed www.notweirdjustautistic.com drowning

Comic Force in Branson, MO

Through my local comic book store, I found that they have Magic the Gathering tournaments with a $5 cost three nights a week.  So, at my age, I’ve started learning to play and most weeks Tye (my autism service dog) and myself will head down there one night a week to play.  

Is it scary to be around a group of people you don’t know?  Yeah, at first it is.  But then you realize that these people have more in common with you than you may think. 

We get slaughtered week after week but I’ve found that the people I’m playing against are extremely compassionate to the fact that I’m a new player, will help explain things to me and will even give me suggestions even when it goes against their best interest in the game. 

When I say “we” get slaughtered, I blame part of it on Tye.  Why blame it on a service dog that literally snores on the floor as I play?  Because it takes some of the heat off me!

So there you have it, a few suggestions on how to avoid drowning in depression. 

This is far from a comprehensive list and in fact, books could be and have been written on the subject.  Consider this a starting point for you in your journey to battle depression.

Now I want to know what you do to battle depression and also if you have tried any of these ideas and how they’ve worked for you.  Use the comments section below to let me know.

Want to keep up with what’s going on at Not Weird Just Autistic? 

Enter your email in the upper right-hand corner where it says, “Get new posts by email” and you’ll be one of the first to get the fresh dirt on all this good stuff.

An Asperger’s Guide To Dating Neurotypicals is out and hit #23 on the Amazon Hot New Dating Releases Chart.  You can find it on Amazon and Kindle or get an autographed copy for the same price at the J.R. Reed Author website.

Before I go, I belong to a closed Facebook group, Aspergers Life Supportrun by some terrific people.  There’s a link on the right or you can click on the words in purple.  If you have Aspergers or are a loving NT of an Aspie, I definitely suggest asking to join the group.  They’re great people and have helped me on many occasions.

Speaking of Asperger’s Life Support, I host a weekly group Mental Health call with rotating topics for Good Men Project and administrator Chris G. of the Asperger’s Life Support group will be my guest this Thursday night (Sept 13) at 9 pm Eastern/6pm Pacific as we talk about the benefits of online support groups.  Please feel free to join the call and join the discussion.  

The call-in number is 701-801-1220 and enter 934 817 242 to get you into the right call.  If you get there a couple minutes early, there will be a Politics call before us, so just hang tight!  

 

Photos courtesy Pixabay, Unsplash & J.R. Reed

For the First Time In Your Life, Conquer The Path To Your Destiny As a song reminded me, we can always change where we're headed

For the First Time In Your Life, Conquer The Path To Your Destiny As a song reminded me, we can always change where we're headed

We’re men.  We conquer things.  Or at least we try to.

 

This post was inspired by the song, According To You, by Orianthi, named one of the World’s Best Female Guitarists by Elle magazine.  She was born in 19585, the year after I graduated high school.  That makes me feel old!

J.R Reed www.notweirdjustautostic.com Not Weird Just Autistic

Lyrics from According To You

The song talks about two choices she has to make about the direction in her love life and reminded me that I too have choices as to which way my life, overall, goes.  In her situation its, “According to you” and “According to him”.  In the lyrics, she looks at all the factors involved in deciding which path her life should take and that made me think of the decisions we make regarding the paths we choose in our lives.

Autism and its two every present antagonist’s Depression and Anxiety have controlled my life to the point where I sat for an hour last night contemplating whether or not I TRULY remember how to have fun in my life.  My final decision was, “No.  I don’t.”  Something I find very sad.  I need to conquer that and learn how to have fun.

My life is full of choices. I can choose which path to go down, though living with autism, those decisions can be pretty scary at times.  We have to think about our fears, our particular triggers, and symptoms of autism. 

You can put a hundred high functioning autistics and come up with seventy-five different set of traits.  Now there will be a group of common ones shared by a majority of us on the spectrum, but we’re all unique individuals with our own set of stuff to deal with and try to conquer.

As we walk down the path of life we eventually come to a fork in the road.  When we hit that fork comes at different life stages for each of us and for some, we run into forked paths more than once.

I go through depressive periods often.  I personally call them, getting into funks.  Sometimes they’re not so bad and other times they’re downright scary.  While in these funks I’m generally standing at a fork in the path and I have a decision to make. 

Do I take the path that keeps me on the same ol, same ‘ol or do I choose the path that I know is better, but that I’m afraid to go down because it’s something I’m not used to?  I want to conquer that fear, but many times I don’t.  I find that to be sad,

One thing a lot of people don’t know about those of us on the spectrum is that we need/crave routine and we don’t like change.  For some of us, that need for routine is rock solid.  We HAVE to do certain things at certain times and in a certain order or our lives fall apart.  Thank God I’m not that type of autistic.  

My need for routine is more like, I put things on my calendar, plan out what I have to do and when things in life pop up that change that schedule, I get panicky.  How bad depends on how severe the change is. 

My daughter, who just turned twenty-one today moved in with me six weeks ago in order to transfer schools and work.  After living alone for three years, I knew it would be a big change in my routine and that it would affect me in an autistic way, but I was willing to conquer my fears because she’s my daughter and I’m willing to put up with all the scariness and panic because I love her.

But back to the paths.

J.R. Reed www.notweirdjustautistic,cin Not Weird Just Autistic

Orienthi

One path is the good path.  It may be a little harder to navigate and there may be some potholes along the way, but this path ultimately brings happiness and makes your life better.

The second path is filled with the same crud we’ve dealt with our whole lives.  Littered across this path are the ones of the people it’s chewed up and every once in a while there is a sign reminding us of who we are.  What’s on that sign?  Look directly below.

“But according to me, you’re stupid, you’re useless and can’t do anything right”

Most of us end up on the second path. Why?  Even though we know it’s not going to be fun, it’s what we’re used to and admit it, change is scary.  I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve started down the first path, only to get freaked out and turn around, run back to the fork and jump back on the other path.

I’ve had several issues in my life lately that either are or seem pretty severe, yet here I stand at the crossroads.  I’ve made a conscious decision to work my butt off to put the fear and anxiety of the unknown treasures of the good path out of my head and take that road.  Why haven’t I started down that path yet?  Because it feels like my feet are dipped in cement and I can’t move.  

Now that the decision is made, once I start moving, I need to keep following that path until the day I die.  I have to because in my 52 years on earth I’ve learned that for me, the same ‘ol, same ‘ol simply sucks, sucks.  And that’s something I’m tired of.

What about you?  What path are you on?  If you’re on the first path and have learned how to navigate it, do us all a favor and drop some knowledge on us in the comment section.  I know a lot of people, including myself, who could really use it.

* * * 

Want to keep up with what’s going on at Not Weird Just Autistic? 

Enter your email in the upper right-hand corner where it says, “Get new posts by email” and you’ll be one of the first to get the fresh dirt on all this good stuff.

An Asperger’s Guide To Dating Neurotypicals is out and hit #23 on the Amazon Hot New Dating Releases Chart.  You can find it on Amazon and Kindle or get an autographed copy for the same price at the J.R. Reed Author website.

Before I go, I belong to a closed Facebook group, Aspergers Life Support, run by some terrific people.  There’s a link on the right or you can click on the words in purple.  If you have Aspergers or are a loving NT of an Aspie, I definitely suggest asking to join the group.  They’re great people and have helped me on many occasions.

Lyrics by Steven Diamond & Andrew Frampton

Pictures courtesy Pixabay & Flick’r Creative Commons